Aura Elite Magazine (UK): Filipina Visual Artist Aze Ong And Her Crochet Installation Art

My fifth contribution – Aura Elite Magazineb Issue 5 (Julie Ann Cover) “Filipina Visual Artist Aze Ong and Her Crochet Installation Art.”

Thank you Dee Sanchez, Chief Editor of Aura and  thank you Aze Ong of Assemblage of Aze Ong. Love your work.

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Originally from Antipolo and now based in Quezon City, Aze Ong was a volunteer teacher assigned to the mountains of Bukidnon. Here she was inspired by the culture of the Talaandig tribe. She firmly believes that art and life must flow together. Her artworks are a realization of experiences of enlightenment nature. She treats them like her own having personalities, characteristics and feelings.

Aze Ong’s work has been showcased even by the National Commission on Culture and the Arts, as well as various galleries and exhibit spaces. Most recently, at the MWS Mussafah Abu Dhabi Art Hub entitled “I Love You Mosque,” with her performance to a traditional Arabic music.

Her art is spontaneously created without patterns, standards, formulas, sketches or studies—the kind you’d never see in real life as they’ve been tucked away and brought together to provide a dreamworld experience. She hopes to share her light and creativity with everyone.

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An extract from Issue 5 (Julie Anne cover) on Aze Ong by Jennifer Bichara

Aura Elite Magazine, Aze Ong, Filipina, Filipina Artist, Visual Artist, Art, Artworks, Handmade Crochet Artworks, Extreme Knitting, Knitting, Crochet Art, Crochet, Crochet Installation, MWS Mussafah Abu Dhabi Art Hub, I Love You Mosque, Philippine Art, Art PH, Performance Artist, Artist Feature

AURA Elite Magazine – Issue 5 (Julie Ann Cover)

Aura Elite Magazine, Aze Ong, Filipina, Filipina Artist, Visual Artist, Art, Artworks, Handmade Crochet Artworks, Extreme Knitting, Knitting, Crochet Art, Crochet, Crochet Installation, MWS Mussafah Abu Dhabi Art Hub, I Love You Mosque, Philippine Art, Art PH, Performance Artist, Artist Feature

Photography by Jeff Scofield

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Photography by Potchie Lazaro

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Photography by Jonas Yu

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Photography by Jonas Yu

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Photography by Albert Labrador

Aura Elite Magazine, Aze Ong, Filipina, Filipina Artist, Visual Artist, Art, Artworks, Handmade Crochet Artworks, Extreme Knitting, Knitting, Crochet Art, Crochet, Crochet Installation, MWS Mussafah Abu Dhabi Art Hub, I Love You Mosque, Philippine Art, Art PH, Performance Artist, Artist Feature

Photography by Albert Labrador

Aura Elite Magazine, Aze Ong, Filipina, Filipina Artist, Visual Artist, Art, Artworks, Handmade Crochet Artworks, Extreme Knitting, Knitting, Crochet Art, Crochet, Crochet Installation, MWS Mussafah Abu Dhabi Art Hub, I Love You Mosque, Philippine Art, Art PH, Performance Artist, Artist Feature

Photo by Jeffrey Calma

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Photography by Jeremy Agsawa

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Photography by Emmanuel Villegas

All images supplied by the artist.

Filipina Visual Artist: Princess Niña N. Cruz

Name of Artist: Princess Niña N. Cruz / Princess / Cess

Art Form: Visual Arts

Areas of Interest:

Still finding projects that I can commit with.

Artist Statement:

I am Princess, 19.

The one who introduced me to art is my mother. She enrolled me to an art workshop when I was only three years old. I took a rest for a couple of years then enrolled to a workshop again. In high school (UP Integrated School), we had an art class that was instructed by Anton Del Castillo, an award-winning artist. He helped me and my classmates to enhance our skills.

Now that I am in college (University of the Philippines Diliman), my course is not art-related but I still make art because it helps me remove the stress that college gives me. I can paint (acrylic & oil) but the most comfortable medium for me is charcoal pencil. Also, I still keep on exploring techniques on YouTube to be comfortable with other mediums (e.g. ballpen, watercolor, & colored pencils!) as well.

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Shailene Woodley (pencil on paper)

Visual Artist, Visual Arts, Filipina, Filipina Artist, Art, Artist, Artist Submission, Artist Statement, Art Profile, Philippines, Princess Cruz, Princess Niña N. Cruz

Lily Collins (pencil on paper)

Visual Artist, Visual Arts, Filipina, Filipina Artist, Art, Artist, Artist Submission, Artist Statement, Art Profile, Philippines, Princess Cruz, Princess Niña N. Cruz

Emma Watson (colored pencil on paper)

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Sherlock (watercolored pencils on paper)

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Unfinished works

Julie Delpy

Julie Delpy

You can contact the artist here:

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Images provided by the artist. Feature Image Credits: Cristina via Facebook.

Get featured! Click here: Artist Profile Submission

Featured Artist: Karen De Pano Picadizo

Her philosophy as visual artist is to live up her commitment in improving the value of life with love and serenity in society particularly for women and children by way of her art. Karen De Pano Picadizo’s ultimate goal as visual artist is to make artworks that can move and touch people and impact their lives in a positive way.

Picadizo’s works usually depicts goodness in humans, and substance of femininity.  The barrel-shaped figure of women suggests fullness of goodness of humans and many describe her works as class and elegant with unique and distinctive style.

Picadizo is an “artist by heart”.  She loves everything that has to do with art.  Art is her passion. Before she became a visual artist, she wanted to be an architect, interior designer, professional wedding photographer, sculpture, pot maker, furniture designer, and even a dress maker.  When she was in high school, she spent her free time designing gowns using typewriting and pencil with intricate and sophisticated details. It was 2011 when she started painting on canvas.  There’s a wall in her house that’s intended for paintings, but due to financial constraint, she decided to make paintings of her own. The rest is history.

As an educator at Binangonan Elementary School in Binangonan, Rizal; she is lucky to have a wide-open opportunity of teaching her students how to draw, paint, and learn how to appreciate art.

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Karen’s students happy posing behind their masterpiece.

Her art style is still mysterious for many art collectors, art enthusiast, artists, and even to the artist herself. 2014 is a fruitful year for her for she gained more clients and collectors.

Get to know how Karen serene fusion of art and education with this set of interview questions from Jenny’s Serendipity.

Enjoy!

How did you interweave the two vocations as a BS Elementary Educator and as an artist?

They just consistently compensate each other with the inspirations I get from both vocations.

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Art by Karen De Pano Picadizo.

Tell me about the beginnings of your art?

When I was in elementary, looking at beautiful paintings in lifestyle magazines made me realize that I want to become an artist someday. My first creation on canvas is a tree.  I love painting trees because it brings back fond memories of my childhood days. When I do modernism art it usually conveys my elegantly simple distinctive style. My favorite subjects include mother and child and women.

What is your favorite among those that you have done and why?

It is really hard to choose because I love them all, but if I really have to choose one talaga (really), it’s “Adore” because it makes me a person with happier soul by simply looking intently to it.

You teach art to elementary students? What is the best advice that you keep telling them?

Yes.  I always tell them to draw or paint what will make them happy, express what they feel, and share their emotions through their art.

How does it feel to be a teacher and an artist at the same time?

It feels great for me because I am able to deal with the passion I have both in teaching and painting with boundless opportunity to share to my pupils which I love doing best.

Artist, Art, Visual Artist, Featured Artist, Pinay, Filipina, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Reflections, Artist Reflections, Artworks, Educator, Teacher Artist, Philippines, Karen De Pano Picadizo, Art Profile, Modernist, Upcoming Artist

Art by Karen De Pano Picadizo.

You have a MAEd in Educational Management; you are also a subject coordinator, head teacher or school administrator now? What drove you to get a MAEd when you teach elementary pupils?

I am the ICT and Science Coordinator in our grade level.  I decided to pursue Master’s Degree because I believe that best teachers are those who strive not only in teaching others but continue their own learning throughout their lives.

Who are your art influences?

My influences are the local and foreign artists I know.  I sincerely look up to them. They continue to influence me through their wonderful works.  Thus, they’ve been playing a great part in my painting career.

You join art exhibits and competitions? What are the most memorable experiences of yours in these?

I’ve joined several art competitions in one of the FB groups. I was once a member before.  I had an honor to compete with many great local and foreign artists. It was ery challenging, fulfilling, fun, and mostly, a memorable experience. Modesty aside, I won several times that made me and my family really happy

Anyone in your family paint? Your husband, is he a painter too?

No, he’s not.  But I am very lucky for he is the one who helps me with my canvas and framing of my artwork.  He’s been supporting me all the way in whatever endeavors I take. We have no kids yet. My brother also paints but not as religiously as I do.

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Her very supportive husband helps with framing for her paintings.

Tell me about your projects?

I paint both commercially and for leisure.  Many of my works were sold already and I am very thankful beyond words to those who have trusted and believed in my works.  They’ve always said that my works depict goodness in human, portray substance of femininity and bring feelings of kindness and love.  I just want to continuously share and spread love through my art and just trust God to whatever plans he has for me.

All images are courtesy of Karen De Pano Picadizo.

To contact Karen, please call her at 09064652017, email: jasonkaren09@gmail.com or via Facebook.

Featured Artist: LYDIA VELASCO

Her love for the arts is an innate calling she traces back to her childhood. She took her early influence and encouragement from parents, who also appreciated the arts. Her father was a set designer for LVN studios while her mother was a typical homemaker who took care of the children, performed regular house chores, and occasionally painted still life works. Since her father earned a humble keep, she had to make the effort to contribute to their needs as fish vendor in Malabon.

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Lydia Velasco, The Artist at Work. Image via Facebook.

Jenny’s Serendipity’s featured artist, Lydia Velasco, was a student of the University of Sto. Tomas and pursued Fine Arts Major in Advertising. She worked shortly after as an artist for the advertising agency Philprom, where she stayed for more than a decade. Rising from the ranks, she became Art Director for several multinational advertising companies such as DYR, J.Walter Thompson, Pacifica, Ace Compton, Basic, and McCann-Erickson. It was in 1988, when she left advertising and ventured in entrepreneurship as co-owner of Lightmoves Photo/Design, Inc., where also became the company’s Art Consultant.

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In her art Velasco merges the dichotomy of the Filipino woman conflicted between spirituality and sensuality.

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

“I was one of those that the bosses would ask to do the story boards for TV commercials of products such as Palmolive and Camay,” she recalls. “Whatever it is, I would make sure their faces contained certain expression—coy, seductive, smiling, or winsomely trying to attract attention.” Quote source Inquirer.net

When her Lightmoves Design was stable, she returned to painting and became core member of Malang’s Saturday Group. Lydia devoted her time fully in painting and went way to discover her art, medium, and style. She focused her subjects on women, liberating them on her canvases and asserting their glory, identity, and freedom amid a mainly patriarchal society. She describes her depictions of women as elongated, massive, heavily set, and invigorated with almost masculine assertiveness.

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

“Lydia Velasco, a once frustrated wannabee movie star who turned to art to help her family survive.”

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

Velasco has emerged as the inspiring matriarch of an artistic “dynasty”, with her daughters, sisters, and grandchildren making their own individual reputation in the field of visual arts.

For 30 years, she painted her heart and at the same time her children followed suit of her artistic endeavors, Chi is into sculpture, Chigo is into the contemporary arts, Owen is an art dealer, and Alona is the manager of the family-owned Galerie Artes.

Velasco is now an icon known worldwide for her own style and depiction of women in different settings and angles.To many, her legacy will always put her on the pedestal she well deserves. Lydia Velasco is a woman of courage, she believes the essence of a woman is not measured by the many laurels and accolades received but how one grows from enduring life’s trials and pains. She is indeed a woman of substance.

She also commits her time with other organizations such as Art Association of the Philippines and  United Women Artists Association of the Philippines.

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

Even as a card-carrying and canvas-bearing feminist, Lydia Velasco has always celebrated the innate femininity of the Filipina which remains deliberately shrouded in mystery and magical allure.

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

Lydia Velasco depicted her women often with massive, even muscular features, and presented them in assertive and aggressive stance.

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

Lydia Velasco creates new works of astounding beauty, a world of lush foliage, abundant waterfalls and colorful flowers.

There is a book written about Lydia Velasco by Galerie Joaquin Managing Director Jack Teotico entitled – “Allure.” Velasco’s main interest is to explore the subject of women in her unique and highly personal style depicting them as strong and sensual, exuding inner beauty and confidence. Lydia’s works free the Asian women from age-old societal conventions by her highly contemporary style of rendition.

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

A modernist master, Lydia Velasco, navigates the levels of feminity in her own creative and artistic terms.

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

Art critic Cid Reyes describes Velasco’s women as strong, resilient yet still overflowing with femininity.

Lydia Velasco, Art, Artist, Visual Artist, Painter, Pinay Artist, Filipina Artist, Filipina, Pinay, Women Empowerment, Feminism in Art, Modern Art, Essence of Women in Art, Philippines

And it was in advertising that Velasco discovered her passion—depicting the female form.

All images are courtesy of Lydia Velasco.

For bookings, you can contact the artist, “Lydia Velasco” via her Facebook page.

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UWAAP Member Artist. United Women Artists Association of the Philippines is an association of empowered Filipina artists in the Philippines and abroad.

Featured Artist: RONNA MANANSALA

Jenny’s Serendipity’s featured artist, Ronna Mannansala, is the granddaughter of the Philippines’ National Artist in Visual Arts, Vicente Manansala, a painter and sculptor.   Her years of childhood were spent with fond memories of her family in the Philippines. Weekends and summer vacations were spent in the house of her Lolo (Grandpa) Enteng.

She was never allowed by her Lolo to go to his studio, being his sacred place, she would peek from the attic while she silently watches and observes her Lolo’s masterly strokes and moments of creation.  She remembers these as her moments of curiosity and wonder, to be one, yet at a distance with her Lolo in pure appreciation of every masterpiece.

As the granddaughter, Ronna Manansala naturally paid homage by interpreting her Lolo’s style that departed from the rural idylls of Fernando Amorsolo for the realism of rural and urban life after the Japanese occupation.  She picked female themes of mother and child, grieving Virgin Mary, market vendors, gossiping women, and family meals and stayed close to his style that departed from analytical cubism or the intentional breaking down of subject into near abstract form.

Ronna in action. Image via Facebook.

Ronna in action. Image via Facebook.

In terms of interpreting his themes, Ronna opted for her progenitor’s time-related representation instead of adapting in current terms.  However, Ronna did not choose a direct interpretation of his style but opted to do it in the opposite manner, through bold colors and sure brushstrokes in the broader concept of the original cubism that is unmistakably her own. They are not delicate but brash, preferring to continue his use of decorative linear planes that run counters to her femininity. If Vicente Manansala was almost feminine, Ronna is near masculine.

Vicente Manansala, Ronna's Manansala Grandfather's work

“Ronna Manasala in National Museum with her grandfathers masterpieces, she did the documentation of 2 of the 7 murals by him.” Image via Facebook.

She also pursued a parallel career in the arts, as a ballet dancer.  It was where she was happiest, yet painting was never forgotten.  Her series of Ballerina paintings blends her love of painting and dancing.  As she moves to new styles of painting entirely her own, she remembers her grandfather, as a child sitting on his lap, hearing his stories and kind words, sharing in his love and joy.

Here is what she shared to us:

How does it feel to be the granddaughter of a National Artist? Is there any pressure? You’re now into art as well. Describe your journey.

It is not easy to be a granddaughter of a National Artist. When I was just starting, a lot of people were putting me down kasi daw (because) all I did was copy my grandfather’s work. Of course I did when I was just starting. It was my way of discovering my momentum. But of course later on – I found my own identity. Nobody even wanted to include me in group exhibits, that is why I decided to go back to school to  pursue masteral studies in Fine Arts.

"Alter Ego" Water color on half sheet water ford paper 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

“Alter Ego” Water color on half sheet water ford paper 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

Your lolo was into the Visual Arts. Is that your goal as well? Do you dream of becoming a national artist on your own right too, someday?

I am into visual arts though not even thinking of becoming popular, more so of becoming a National Artist. I do what I do because I love doing it.

You are also a ballet dancer. How does that work for you? How does performance art intertwine with your visual art?

I used to dance ballet but not anymore for a long time. It is something that will always be close to my heart. Having that in me is enough to be inspired in doing my art.

Reading your bio, it mentions that you have a penchant to paint into the feminine. Is there a conscious effort? Expound the logic or the vision behind taking on the feminine form in your art.

There is no conscious effort. Maybe, it’s because I was closer to the women of the family.

"Glass Floor" Water color on half sheet water ford paper 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

“Glass Floor” Water color on half sheet water ford paper 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

It said in your bio too that you have adaptation versions of your lolo’s works and that of Amorsolo. Why did you do it? Is there a line-up of other artists in the future whom you intend to cover?

No, not of Amorsolo but only of my grandfather. I did it to find my momentum and later on to discover what I really want.

Among your art work, which is your favorite and why?

I guess, it’s my ballerinas because it is also what I used to love doing.

You are taking up masteral studies now in UST. Do you intend to teach in college or is that for promotion in the corporate world?

The only reason why I am back in school is for self-betterment, hoping to learn more. Teaching is something that I might consider but maybe only on a part-time basis. My goal is just to be better and learn.

Ronna Manansala Artwork (6)

“My Toeshoes” Water color on half sheet water ford paper 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

"My Passion" Water color on half sheet water ford paper 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

“My Passion” Water color on half sheet water ford paper 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

How many siblings do you have? Are you the only descendant who inherited your lolo’s love for art?

With my mom, there are only three of us and yes, I am the only one who loves art. I guess because I was the only one who pursued it.

Why do you use bold strokes in your work? Describe your trademark as an artist in contrast to that of your lolo, Amorsolo and others?

I am more comfortable in doing so. Gusto ko kasi yung parang walang limitasyon yung mga (I like it that there seems to be no limitation in the) lines.

Who are the other artists of today that you look up to and why?

Marami (A lot) –  my classmates in school, my co-artists in my various art group kasi (because) I learn a lot from them.

What is the future of your art? Any grandiose plans you want to plug?

I would not know but for sure, I have no plans of giving up for more self-betterment.

"Bandila, Mahal kong Ina" 24 x 36 inches Acrylic on canvas 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

“Bandila, Mahal kong Ina” 24 x 36 inches Acrylic on canvas 2014, Art by Ronna Manansala

"Makabagong Eva at Adan" 36 x 36 inches Acrylic on canvas 2012, Art by Ronna Manansala

“Makabagong Eva at Adan” 36 x 36 inches Acrylic on canvas 2012, Art by Ronna Manansala

All images are courtesy of Ronna Manansala.

For bookings, you can contact the artist, “Ronna Manansala” via her email ronna_manansala@yahoo.com and in Facebook.

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UWAAP, United Women Artists Association of the Philippines, Empowered Filipina Artists, Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SMBA), 1st SBMA ‘Bagong Pinay’ Arts Summit, Ang Bagong Pinay, Pinay, Filipina, Filipina Artist, Art Summit, Women Empowerment, Art Exhibit, Interaction Painting, Philippines

UWAAP Member Artist. United Women Artists Association of the Philippines is an association of empowered Filipina artists in the Philippines and abroad.

Filipinas all over gather for love of art at the 1st SBMA ‘Bagong Pinay’ Arts Summit

Menchu VB Arandilla, President of United Women Artists Association of the Philippines (UWAAP), an association of empowered Filipina artists in the Philippines and abroad in cooperation with Subic Bay Metropolitan Authority (SMBA), mounted an art and photo exhibit last – Nov. 9-16 at Harbor Point, Subic Bay Freeport Zone and Nov.26-27 at Subic Bay Exhibition & Convention Center at Efficiency Road Subic Bay Gateway Park, Subic Bay Freeport Zone.

“This is a historic event for SBMA in the sense that this is the first gathering to tackle gender and development,” remarked SBMA Chairman and Administrator Roberto Garcia as he welcomed participants. 

“I am sure that from the line-up of speakers you have prepared, you will learn so much on how we can further promote the concept of ‘Ang Bagong Pinay’ and address the issues that confront women in the workplace today,” Garcia added. 

The event was organized by the SBMA thru its Gender and Development Focal Point System and as part of the SBMA’s week-long celebration of its 22nd founding anniversary.

The first SBMA Women’s Summit for art with the theme, “Ang Bagong Pinay,” held interactive or live art and on the spot sketching and art demonstration activities. The gathering sought to promote the welfare and development of womenfolk and update them on the latest socio-economic and political issues that have significant bearing on them.

UWAAP's turn over of their artwork to SBMA's Project Development Office during the 1st SBMA's Women's Summit,Nov (2)

UWAAP's turn over of their artwork to SBMA's Project Development Office during the 1st SBMA's Women's Summit,Nov (3)

UWAAP at Subic Bay Freeport Zone - SBMA, Olongapo City.

United Women Artists Association of the Phils.(UWAAP) @ 1st SBMA Women’s Summit Art Exhibit and “4 x 8 ” feet Interaction Painting Nov.26-27,2014

UWAAP’s VISION and MISSION aims to do the same as the 1st SBMA ‘Bagong Pinay’ Arts Summit:

1.) To highlight the importance of women artists’ role through a remarkable contribution in the social, economic, political, and cultural realm of the Filipino society.

2.) To advance, foster and promote the interests of those who work in the fine arts including the painters, sculptress, graphic artists, photographers and other women artists working in the various fields of art.

3.) To provide an opportunity for every member in establishing herself as an artist thus ensuring her economic viability.

4.) To encourage solidarity among the women artists where mutual talents are polished and shared through various art programs and endeavors.

5.) To provide a strong support system which cultivates dignity and self-esteem and develops fellowship that is built on trust, love and respect.

6.) To link up and enter into agreement for the common good and in consensus with each member of the association, with other individuals, groups or organizations whose cooperation shall be deemed helpful, here and abroad.

United Women Artists Association of the Phils.(UWAAP)

Camarines Sur 3rd District Representative Maria Leonor “Leni” Robredo was guest of honor in the assembly and imparted her ideas on “Women and their Careers on being a Wife, Mother and Leader.”

Other speakers who fired up the summit with timely discussions were: Philip Morris Fortune Tobacco Corporation Inc. Director for External Affairs Varinia Tinga spoke on “Women in the Corporate World”; Subic Bay Colleges Inc. Vice President for Academic Affair Marilou Nicart tackled “Telecommuting for Women”; Sandiganbayan Third Division Executive Clerk of Court Dennis Pulma spoke on “Violence Against Women,” as well as RA 10398, an act declaring November 25 as National Consciousness Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women and Children; and SM elevator girl and YouTube sensation Cheridel Alejandrino urged womenfolk to “Be The Best That You Can Be.” Also, FQ Mom Rose Fausto talked about “Financial Liberation for Women”; and Philippine Commission on Women Executive Director Emmeline Verzosa lectured on “Magna Carta of Women.”

Those who trooped to the Women’s Summit were employees of the SBMA, workers of Subic Bay Freeport companies, employees of the Authority of Freeport Area of Bataan (AFAB), and residents and students from Olongapo City and parts of Zambales.

UWAAP is a group of women artists from the Philippines having ethical manners, high self-esteem, strong yet feminine qualities, exuding class, self-respect and dignity. They have high regard for inner happiness, trustworthiness and we are also domestic goddesses on our own right. Truly Women of Substance, the United Women Artists Association of the Philippines is dedicated towards honoring the Filipino women artists who are making and will be making remarkable contributions and relevance to our society, but not limited to the local and international art scene. Get to know them one by one through their dedicated page.

UWAAP with active members

Other activities during the celebration of the SBMA anniversary were a jobs fair at the Harbor Point mall, where 10,386 job positions were opened to applicants; the annual recognition of the Ten Most Outstanding Freeport Workers who epitomize the best of what the Subic Bay Freeport has to offer in terms of workers’ performance; and the Milestone Service Awards that recognized around 200 SBMA employees who have been serving the agency for 15 and 20 years. 

For opportunities and news info about women empowerment in the arts, you get in touch with United WAAP’s Founder/President Menchu V.B. Arandilla or any of the following UWAAP Officers 2014-2016: Vice-President- Lydia Velasco, Secretary Ronna Manansala, Treasurer-Marivel Mari-Galang, Auditor Dr.Annabel Cadiz; Board of Directors and members: Zen AP Chan, Yolanda De Castro Cabuco, Raquel Arboleda-Jacob, Jing Banawan, Liz Tarnate, Minerva Dacanay, Luzviminda Horlador-Santillan, Millet Galeos Sacerdoti and Raech Dacanay.

Menchu VB Arandilla who I featured here earlier was a participant at the event.  Exhibits co-sponsored by UWAAP are still ongoing this December.

All images are courtesy of United Women Artists Association of the Philippines.

Reference Article 

Blog Count: (6) Meet Jenny’s Serendipity | Pinay.com

Another blessing!  

My blog, Jenny’s Serendipity, got featured in Pinay.com Blog Count Series. Blog Count is a series of conversations with Pinay’s all over the world. Click on the link for a more detail story on what’s up with Jenny’s Serendipity.

My very first feature was actually from Stuart Young of  “The Change Your Life Blog”.